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PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2017 5:27 pm 

Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2017 11:45 pm
Posts: 4
Hello,

In my company we use a variety of different tools to create our layouts:
- Helios 3D (AutoCAD based) for advanced layouts
- SunDAT (SketchUp based) for conceptual layouts
- Helioscope (web based) for conceptual layouts

I am quite familiar with importing .h2p files from Helios 3D into PVSyst. This works great.

I am also quite familiar with importing .dae and .3ds files (for the shading scene without the PV) from SketchUp into PVsyst. So far what I was doing was to create the shading scene in SketchUp then add the PV in PVsyst which takes extra time and adds some inaccuracy in the module placing.

However, I would like to be able to import both (the shading scene as well as the PV). I recently realized that PVSyst offers that option: http://files.pvsyst.com/help/index.html?sketchup.htm which is great.

While I was successful with SunDAT after multiple tries I am struggling with Helioscope.

With SunDAT I create the layout in SketchUp then export the 3D model to .dae. Then assign the PV in the PVobject tab. I do not find this PV object tab very intuitive as I see no relation in the name of the PVobjects with the ones in my SUnDAT layout. Anyway I know it can work. It is just not very intuitive. If anyone has some tips here, please do share.

With Helioscope which is CAD based I have been unsuccessful so far. I strictly followed the tutorial in the PVsyst 6 Help and it does not seem to help.
To give more details, here is what I have done:
1) Exported from Helioscope the layout to .dxf file which i saved as a .dwg
2) Converted the module which came as 3D polyline from Helioscope to surface then mesh
3) Exported to .fbx in Autocad
4) Converted from .fbx to .dae with Autodesk FBX Converter x64 2013
5) Import into PVSyst

The issue I ran into is that the PVobjects does not even show just as there was nothing in the 3D model that could potentially be interpreted as a module by PVSyst.
I spend quite a good amount of time troubleshooting this but but so far was unsuccessful.
I even copied and pasted the module from SunDAT into my Helioscope layoiut.

Would it be possible to share more information about:
- the type of objects (surface, solid, mesh?) PV modules should be in Autocad so that they appear in the PVObjects tab
- any type of setting while exporting to .fbx from Autocad FX export dunction
- any type of settings while exporting to .dae with Autodesk FBX Converter x64 2013
- any DOs and DONTs when importing a shading scene along with PV modules into PVSyst

Thanks a lot for your assistance on this.

Best,

Adrien


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2017 10:49 am 
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Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2012 11:12 am
Posts: 116
Hello Adrien,

What you seem to be misunderstanding is that the "PV objects" tab is not listing the objects found in the imported file but the materials.

We chose to rely on the material instead of the objects because :
- we can't convert full objects to PV faces, as this would mean that if you defined a parallelepiped PV module all of its 6 faces would be transformed to PV faces,
- the material is easy to apply on faces in 3D modeling software, and it is always copied along with the object when you duplicate it
- it's easier to select one or two materials than hundreds or thousands of objects for complex scenes

So if you define a "PV face" material in Sketchup or AutoCAD and apply it on the real PV face of your objects, then you should be able to select it after you import the DAE file in PVsyst.

About the settings information you're asking for, there shouldn't be any particular setting needed, the default ones should export and convert the materials correctly.
The only advice I could give you would be to try to keep things simple, the complexity of the scene geometry has a direct impact on shadings calculation time.
However you may want to have a very detailed and good-looking scene on your simulation report, in this case you may consider disabling shadow casting for objects which you know won't project any shadow on your PV fields, and this will ease calculations.

I hope I could help you on that, you seem to be using this new import feature quite intensively which is great !

Sylvain


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:23 pm 

Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2017 11:45 pm
Posts: 4
Thanks a lot Sylvain for your reply.
I completely ignored the concept of material with limited proficiency with Autocad and my igmorance of 3D modelling.
I tried to add material to the modules in the DXF file from Helioscope without any success.
I also tried converting the objects into different objects such as plane surface, mesh... making sure the same material is applied to them.
I have attached the DXF file from Helioscope. If someone has any idea how to import modules into PVSyst from there that would be super helpful.

Thanks for your help.

Adrien


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 8:34 pm 

Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2018 5:23 pm
Posts: 2
Quote:
Hello Adrien,

What you seem to be misunderstanding is that the "PV objects" tab is not listing the objects found in the imported file but the materials.

We chose to rely on the material instead of the objects because :
- we can't convert full objects to PV faces, as this would mean that if you defined a parallelepiped PV module all of its 6 faces would be transformed to PV faces,
- the material is easy to apply on faces in 3D modeling software, and it is always copied along with the object when you duplicate it
- it's easier to select one or two materials than hundreds or thousands of objects for complex scenes

So if you define a "PV face" material in Sketchup or AutoCAD and apply it on the real PV face of your objects, then you should be able to select it after you import the DAE file in PVsyst.

About the settings information you're asking for, there shouldn't be any particular setting needed, the default ones should export and convert the materials correctly.
The only advice I could give you would be to try to keep things simple, the complexity of the scene geometry has a direct impact on shadings calculation time.
However you may want to have a very detailed and good-looking scene on your simulation report, in this case you may consider disabling shadow casting for objects which you know won't project any shadow on your PV fields, and this will ease calculations.

I hope I could help you on that, you seem to be using this new import feature quite intensively which is great !

Sylvain
I adjusted the layer name in Autocad and made sure it fell in line with the actual modules and had no success. Im still getting 0's when I import the .dae


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 3:51 pm 

Joined: Fri Sep 21, 2018 3:41 pm
Posts: 1
Hello,

It seems I have similar problem to Adrien. May anyone send me a sample AUTOCAD file ( I am using the 2012version) which I could later transform using .fbx converter and upload it to PVSYST. I just want to know how I should define the material for faces to be recocnized correctly as PV fields.

Regards - M


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2019 11:10 am 

Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2019 2:54 pm
Posts: 1
Both AutoCAD vs SketchUp are popular choices in the market; let us discuss some of the significant Difference Between AutoCAD vs SketchUp :

AutoCAD is a tool which is primarily used to draft and design 2D designs and print those designs on paper for use on the field, whereas SketchUp is a 3D modeling tool which helps you design models based on how they would look in the real life.
AutoCAD has many features and plugins available so that you may customize the designs precisely as per your needs. This makes learning AutoCAD a time-taking task. On the other hand, SketchUp has a simpler interface and can be learned relatively fast.
AutoCAD does not import many different file types for editing and integration, while SketchUp is less adamant about it. AutoCAD can only import .dwg files, while SketchUp can also load 3DS files, which is a popular format.
AutoCAD is comparatively better than SketchUp when it comes to rendering the details. Models in AutoCAD can effectively replicate shadows under various lighting conditions. Designs in SketchUp are not as detailed compared to AutoCAD and one can tell looking at the design it is software work.
AutoCAD has developed twelve extensions for discipline-specific applications. SketchUp does not offer a different vertical for different applications.
AutoCAD monthly subscription plans start from INR 10,000. Sketchup is available as a free software with two paid plans; one plan with INR 8500 per month. SketchUp can also be purchased for a lifetime license for approx. INR 50,000.
AutoCAD has no official library to which different users can upload and share their designs. SketchUp has a huge library under the name of 3D Warehouse which involves thousands of users who regularly upload and download different designs directly from the portal.
AutoCAD does not allow importing files from the internet directly. It must be first downloaded on to your system before loading it into the software. SketchUp can directly fetch designs up to 50MB large and load them directly into the software which you can download later.
Are you searching for home designing for floor,room and hall? We have a solution as a online Myplan community hub which provides the best floor plan or 3d house design online for your home designed by the best architect,interior designers and enginners. They all designed according to the vastushastra.

AutoCAD is also available in a student version which comes at a smaller price while SketchUp does not offer a student concession.
AutoCAD can support many APIs such as AutoLISP, Visual LISP, VBA etc. so that you may customize and/or automate your tasks to some extent. SketchUp does not support many APIs and features a native integration for LayOut API.
While AutoCAD has its own large set of plug-ins available for integration, it does not support and third-party plugins. All plug-ins must be installed from the Autodesk App Store. SketchUp can integrate third-party plug-ins which can be added from the Extension Warehouse, a site hosted for the same purpose.
AutoCAD is available in more than 10 different languages and documentation can be done in additional languages too. On the other hand, Sketchup is only available in 9 languages at the moment.
Since AutoCAD has a lot of tools to choose from, the UI may appear cluttered at times. SketchUp has a comparatively simpler UI and can get the user acquainted quickly.


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